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Yong Computer

How to make the computer faster

1. Benchmarks Show Dramatic Performance Gains with an SSD Drive UpgradeHot PC Tips - SSD

The prices continue to drop on SSD drives, making them now, more than ever, an attractive upgrade for your PC or Laptop.  In short there are three reasons you should consider an SSD Upgrade, swapping our that primary hard drive with an SSD drive.

  1. Significantly Improved Read/Write Performance
  2. They Consume Less Power
  3. They are Durable

They also weigh less and operate cooler for you laptop fans: Let’s look at the big three in more detail.

SSDs are Much Faster:

SSDs have up to 100 times greater performance with almost instantaneous data access.  You will find your system boots faster (up to 2X), and has significantly faster file transfers, and and provides overall a faster computing experience than traditional hard drives. Hard drives have a lot of moving parts and rely on the spinning disk to access the data.  All data on the SSD Drive can be accessed at once.Hot PC Tips - SSD Drive (1)

SSDs Consume Less Power:

SSDs use significantly less power at peak load than hard drives. Typically for laptops a Hard Drive uses somewhere in the 6 watt range with SSD drives consuming less than two watts. This energy efficiency translates to longer battery life in notebooks, and a cooler computing environment.Hot PC Tips - SSD Drive (2)

SSDs are More Durable:

Solid State Drives feature a non-mechanical design of NAND flash memory mounted on circuit boards, and are shock resistant up to 1500g/0.5ms. Hard Drives consist of various moving parts making them much more susceptible to shock and damage.Hot PC Tips - SSD Drive (6)

As is common in the wonderful world of electronics, price drops are inevitable.  Prices have dropped 20-30% in 2014 from 2013. If you shop around, you will find great deals from time to time on sources like Amazon, Newegg, and those deal of the day sites.

So… how much capacity do I need?  In the case of a desktop, you can use a relatively small SSD, say 120Gb, and locate all your large storage needs on a 2nd hard drive. In the case of a laptop with only a single hard drive bay, you will want to purchase a large hard enough SSD to store all the data you need, maybe 256 or 512Gb SSD.  If you have the funds, you can buy SSD Drives as large as 1TB.

If money is no object, and your system supports multiple drives and has a RAID controller, you can arrange two identical capacity SSD drives in a RAID 0 configuration for even more performance improvements. RAID 0 works far better with SSDs than it does with hard drives, because mechanical drives aren’t fast enough to take full advantage of the increased bandwidth. In most cases, running SSDs in tandem works really, really well. Raid 0 is not a good idea with hard drives, since if one fails you are in trouble.

If your computer supports SATA III (6 Gbits/s) you want to make sure the SSD drive also supports this standard. If you have a desktop PC, make sure you connect your SSD drive to the fastest SATA port on your computer. Read more about this here:

Many SSD drives come complete with Disk Cloning software, which is the easiest way to do a rapid upgrade. Once your drive is installed you should verify the trim setting. Read more about this here:

Checking Amazon as of this writing, you can get a 120 GB SSD Drive for 65$, can you say WOW! A 480 GB SSD can be purchased for the affordable price of $190. One note: SSD technology and software has changed significanlty over the last couple of years, so check the performance of the particular SSD Drive before you take the plunge. Don’t buy one of the older generation drives, since for just a bit more you can buy one with faster memory and a better controller.

You can find performance reviews for a myriad of SSD drives on the web on sources like Toms Hardware and others.

I have upgraded numerous systems with solid-state drives. In every case the customer has been impressed. You will be too!

Upgrade your Hard Drive, you will be glad you did!

Source:
  • http://ocz.com/consumer/ssd-guide/ssd-vs-hdd

2. Optimize Windows for better performance

Try the Performance troubleshooter

The first thing that you can try is the Performance troubleshooter, which can automatically find and fix problems. The Performance troubleshooter checks issues that might slow down your computer's performance, such as how many users are currently logged on to the computer and whether multiple programs are running at the same time.

 

Open the Performance troubleshooter by clicking the Start button The Start button , and then clicking Control Panel. In the search box, type troubleshooter, and then click Troubleshooting. Under System and Security, click Check for performance issues.

 

Delete programs you never use

Many PC manufacturers pack new computers with programs you didn't order and might not want. These often include trial editions and limited-edition versions of programs that software companies hope you'll try, find useful, and then pay to upgrade to full versions or newer versions. If you decide you don't want them, keeping the software on your computer might slow it down by using precious memory, disk space, and processing power.

It's a good idea to uninstall all the programs you don't plan to use. This should include both manufacturer-installed software and software you installed yourself but don't want any more—especially utility programs designed to help manage and tune your computer's hardware and software. Utility programs such as virus scanners, disk cleaners, and backup tools often run automatically at startup, quietly chugging along in the background where you can't see them. Many people have no idea they're even running.

Even if your PC is older, it might contain manufacturer-installed programs that you never noticed or have since forgotten about. It's never too late to remove these and get rid of the clutter and wasted system resources. Maybe you thought you might use the software someday, but never did. Uninstall it and see if your PC runs faster.

Limit how many programs run at startup

Many programs are designed to start automatically when Windows starts. Software manufacturers often set their programs to open in the background, where you can't see them running, so they'll open right away when you click their icons. That's helpful for programs you use a lot, but for programs you rarely or never use, this wastes precious memory and slows down the time it takes Windows to finish starting up.

Decide for yourself if you want a program to run at startup.

But how can you tell what programs run automatically at startup? Sometimes this is obvious, because the program adds an icon to the notification area on the taskbar, where you can see it running. Look there to see if there are any programs running that you don’t want to start automatically. Point to each icon to see the program name. Be sure to click the Show hidden icons button so you don't miss any icons.

Even after you check the notification area, you might still miss some programs that run automatically at startup. AutoRuns for Windows, a free tool that you can download from the Microsoft website, shows you all of the programs and processes that run when you start Windows. You can stop a program from running automatically when Windows starts by opening the AutoRuns for Windows program, and then by clearing the check box next to the name of the program you want to stop. AutoRuns for Windows is designed for advanced users.

Defragment your hard disk

Fragmentation makes your hard disk do extra work that can slow down your computer. Disk Defragmenter rearranges fragmented data so your hard disk can work more efficiently. Disk Defragmenter runs on a schedule, but you can also defragment your hard disk manually.

Clean up your hard disk

Unnecessary files on your hard disk take up disk space and can slow down your computer. Disk Cleanup removes temporary files, empties the Recycle Bin, and removes a variety of system files and other items that you no longer need.

Run fewer programs at the same time

Sometimes changing your computing behavior can have a big impact on your PC's performance. If you're the type of computer user who likes to keep eight programs and a dozen browser windows open at once—all while sending instant messages to your friends—don't be surprised if your PC bogs down. Keeping a lot of e‑mail messages open can also use up memory.

If you find your PC slowing down, ask yourself if you really need to keep all your programs and windows open at once. Find a better way to remind yourself to reply to e‑mail messages rather than keeping all of them open.

Make sure you're only running one antivirus program. Running more than one antivirus program can also slow down your computer. Fortunately, if you're running more than one antivirus program, Action Center notifies you and can help you fix the problem.

Turn off visual effects

If Windows is running slowly, you can speed it up by disabling some of its visual effects. It comes down to appearance versus performance. Would you rather have Windows run faster or look prettier? If your PC is fast enough, you don't have to make this tradeoff, but if your computer is just barely powerful enough for Windows 7, it can be useful to scale back on the visual bells and whistles.

You can choose which visual effects to turn off, one by one, or you can let Windows choose for you. There are 20 visual effects you can control, such as the transparent glass look, the way menus open or close, and whether shadows are displayed.

To adjust all visual effects for best performance:

  1. Open Performance Information and Tools by clicking the Start button The Start button, and then clicking Control Panel. In the search box, type Performance Information and Tools, and then, in the list of results, click Performance Information and Tools.
  2. Click Adjust visual effects Administrator permission required. If you're prompted for an administrator password or confirmation, type the password or provide confirmation.
  3. Click the Visual Effects tab, click Adjust for best performance, and then click OK. (For a less drastic option, select Let Windows choose what’s best for my computer.)

 

Restart regularly

This tip is simple. Restart your PC at least once a week, especially if you use it a lot. Restarting a PC is a good way to clear out its memory and ensure that any errant processes and services that started running get shut down.

Restarting closes all the software running on your PC—not only the programs you see running on the taskbar, but also dozens of services that might have been started by various programs and never stopped. Restarting can fix mysterious performance problems when the exact cause is hard to pinpoint.

If you keep so many programs, e‑mail messages, and websites open that you think restarting is a hassle, that's probably a sign you should restart your PC. The more things you have open and the longer you keep them running, the greater the chances your PC will bog down and eventually run low on memory.

Add more memory

This isn't a guide to buying hardware that will speed up your computer. But no discussion of how to make Windows run faster would be complete without mentioning that you should consider adding more random access memory (RAM) to your PC.

If a computer running Windows 7 seems too slow, it's usually because the PC doesn't have enough RAM. The best way to speed it up is to add more.

Windows 7 can run on a PC with 1 gigabyte (GB) of RAM, but it runs better with 2 GB. For optimal performance, boost that to 3 GB or more.

Another option is to boost the amount of memory by using Windows‌ ReadyBoost. This feature allows you to use the storage space on some removable media devices, such as USB flash drives, to speed up your computer. It’s easier to plug a flash drive into a USB port than to open your PC case and plug memory modules into its motherboard.

Check for viruses and spyware

If your PC is running slowly, it's possible that it's infected with a virus or spyware. This is not as common as the other problems, but it's something to consider. Before you worry too much, check your PC using antispyware and antivirus programs.

A common symptom of a virus is a much slower-than-normal computer performance. Other signs include unexpected messages that pop up on your PC, programs that start automatically, or the sound of your hard disk constantly working.

Spyware is a type of program that's installed, usually without your knowledge, to watch your activity on the Internet. You can check for spyware with Windows Defender or other antispyware programs.

The best way to deal with viruses is to prevent them in the first place. Always run antivirus software and keep it up to date. Even if you take such precautions, however, it's possible for your PC to become infected.

Check your computer's speed

If you try these tips and your computer is still too slow, you might need a new PC or some hardware upgrades, such as a new hard disk or faster video card. There's no need to guess the speed of your computer, however. Windows provides a way to check and rate your PC's speed with a tool called the Windows Experience Index.

The Windows Experience Index rates your computer on five key components and gives you a number for each, as well as an overall base score. This base score is only as good as your worst-performing component subscore. Base scores currently range from 1 to 7.9. If your PC is rated lower than 2 or 3, it might be time to consider a new PC, depending on what tasks you want to do with your computer.

Change the size of virtual memory

If you receive warnings that your virtual memory is low, you'll need to increase the minimum size of your paging file. Windows sets the initial minimum size of the paging file equal to the amount of random access memory (RAM) installed on your computer, and the maximum size equal to three times the amount of RAM installed on your computer. If you see warnings at these recommended levels, then increase the minimum and maximum sizes.

  1. Open System by clicking the Start button The Start button, right-clicking Computer, and then clicking Properties.
  2. In the left pane, click Advanced system settings Administrator permission required. If you're prompted for an administrator password or confirmation, type the password or provide confirmation.
  3. On the Advanced tab, under Performance, click Settings.
  4. Click the Advanced tab, and then, under Virtual memory, click Change.
  5. Clear the Automatically manage paging file size for all drives check box.
  6. Under Drive[Volume Label], click the drive that contains the paging file you want to change.
  7. Click Custom size, type a new size in megabytes in the Initial size (MB) or Maximum size (MB) box, click Set, and then click OK.